World Record Academy
 
 WORLD RECORDS
 
 World Records Club

 Book of World Records
 
 
           Add to Google
  Add to My Yahoo!
           Add to myAOL Favorites
 
   
          
  
                

 
 
 Terms of Use
  Privacy
  


 Most hours spent flying the F-16 -Air Force pilot sets world record

  Balad Air Base, IRAQ--By the time Lieutenant Colonel Michael Brill touched down after a combat mission over Iraq earlier today, he had broken his own world record for the most hours spent flying the F-16 Fighting Falcon. Brill, a 421st Expeditionary Fighter Squadron pilot, has logged more than 6,000 hours in the F-16.
  Photo:Lt. Col. Michael Brill, a 421st EFS pilot, climbs into F-16C block 40 #88-0466 (marked 466TH FS) from the 4th FS before flying a combat mission over Iraq at Balad AB on May 2, 2008. On that day Colonel Brill broke the world record he previously set for F-16 flying hours when he surpassed the 6,000 hours milestone. Colonel Brill is deployed from Hill AFB. [USAF photo by SrA Julianne Showalter] (enlarge photo)

  "The sustained effort required to spend 6,000 hours flying the F-16 is phenomenal," said Brig. Gen. Burt Field, the commander of 332nd Air Expeditionary Wing, which the 421 EFS falls under.   
  Photo:Lt. Col. Michael Brill, a 421st EFS pilot, is congratulated by his wingman, Brig. Gen. Burt Field, 332nd AEW commander, after the colonel successfully completed more than 6,000 flying hours in an F-16 during an OIF combat mission at Balad AB on May 2, 2008. Colonel Brill is deployed from Hill AFB. [USAF photo by SrA Julianne Showalter]-enlarge photo

   "Six thousand hours equates to 250 days in the cockpit -- not counting all the time in ground ops before and after the flight. That is an incredible amount of time in a high-G [force], high-speed, high-stress arena.

  Photo: Lt. Col. Michael Brill, a 421st EFS pilot, and wingman Brig. Gen. Burt Field, 332nd AEW commander, listen to an intelligence brief before flying a combat mission over Iraq at Balad AB on May 2, 2008.[USAF photo by SrA Julianne Showalter] -enlarge photo


   "Flying fighters is mentally and physically challenging. The environment, threat, systems, weapons and the mission set are constantly changing and require a disciplined program of study and practice to remain on the cutting edge," said the general who graduated with the colonel in 1979 from the Air Force Academy. The two attended F-16 training together at Hill Air Force Base, Utah in 1980.

  Despite the challenges of flying the F-16 almost constantly since 1980, Colonel Brill said he wouldn't have it any other way.

   "I love to fly. I don't remember ever wanting to do anything else. There is a communication between me and the machine. Flying an airplane is like being on a roller coaster that you can steer," said the colonel who grew up on various Marine Corps bases, but calls Virginia home.

   His status as a deployed Reservist is an example of the Air Force's integration of personnel from all military branches -- active duty, Reserve and Air National Guard.

   "The Air Force has been over here in Southwest Asia for 17 years," General Field said. "To accomplish our mission, we have needed the Guard and Reserve every single day of those 17 years. They bring experience, judgment and maturity to the fight in a variety of different mission sets and you can't tell them apart from the active-duty [Airmen] by their appearance, dedication, pride or job performance."

   His combat experience includes three tours in support of Operation Northern Watch, two in support of Operation Southern Watch, two in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom, and one in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.
   Photo: Lt. Col. Michael Brill, a 421st EFS pilot, prepares to don his helmet before flying a combat mission over Iraq at Balad AB on May 2, 2008. On that day Colonel Brill broke the world record he previously set for F-16 flying hours when he surpassed the 6,000 hours milestone. [USAF photo by SrA Julianne Showalter] - enlarge photo)
    Additionally, he led the first F-16 strike into Afghanistan following Sept. 11, 2001, a 10-hour mission he described as an "eye opening experience."

   The more recent combat missions he has flown since arriving in Iraq in March have been a lot "quieter," because fewer munitions have needed to be dropped -- an indication that the Global War on Terrorism is being on won, the colonel said.

   Many of the missions flown by pilots in Iraq are reconnaissance missions, where information is gathered using high-tech cameras to identify potential ground threats.

   "Our primary mission [as flyers providing close air support for ground units] is to make noise. We are up there to let the bad guys know what we're capable of and to keep them hunkered down. This allows the [ground personnel] to work to establish good relationships with the people who are helping us. The impact of the airpower is knowing that the airplane overhead gives people on the ground an umbrella of safety that is basically irreplaceable," Colonel Brill said.

   Pilots alone cannot accomplish the Air Force's mission, Colonel Brill said.

   "The fact that I've flown 6,000 hours of incident-free flying is a testament to an amazing machine and our dedicated maintenance support Airmen," the colonel said.
 
   Though Colonel Brill is the only person to ever surpass the 6,000 flying hour mark in an F-16, he's already looking to the future. With five years left until his retirement, Colonel Brill said he doubts he'll be able to hit 7,000 flying hours, but is willing to give it a try. "If they want to throw that many sorties at me, I'll take them. I never say no when they ask me to fly. I love it."

    F-16 pilots keep track of their peers on www.f-16.net, which gives a clear picture of the life span of a career F-16 fighter pilot.    
    The site lists 2,385 pilots in the 1,000-hour club and 538 in the 2,000-hour club. From there the decline in flying time is quite steep: only 21 throughout the flying forces of the world have reached 4,000 hours, and only one other pilot, also an American, will be in the 5,000-hour category once Brill hits the 6K mark.

  Brill is the most experienced F-16 pilot among the 24 countries that fly the multi-role fighter, a distinction he has held since he was the first American fighter pilot, in 1993, to reach 3,000 hours.

   Brill is a full-time fighter pilot with the Air Force Reserve's 419th Fighter Wing at Hill Air Force Base. He has been deployed in Iraq since March 2007 and is expected to return home in May.

 
 
           Add to Google
  Add to My Yahoo!

   [ Submit a world record ] [ World Record Certificate

  [Book of World Records] [World Records Store] [Club]

 

 

   

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

   

   

 


         
     Fastest Jump Shooter in Billiards-Rocky Lane
  

   

   Largest miniature railroad-Miniatur Wunderland
 
   

   
    
Fastest race around the 'World'-Rohan Veal
                   
 
    Fastest board breaking-record set by Mitch Ellis